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 The second I stepped in her studio in the 7th Ward I immediately began photographing this single palm frond in a vase of green water. White painting canvases were on her windows diffusing the light and the distressed wood panel wall was the perfect background.  I started to think of what Dawn had said about how the natural world had such an influence on her and at the same time, and I also thought of her mastery of so many media as art like: wood, metal, photography, and water. Dawn has the unique ability to see and feel the story of what she is inspired by and the ability to adapt that story to whatever media will speak the message properly. At any time though, that media can change...  This got me thinking about photographing her with the natural landscape in her studio. Since the natural world is where she is inspired and the studio is where she creates, we needed not step into the oppressive New Orleans heat. We were right where we needed to be.
  "I love the natural world and it's the assault on the natural world (our coastline, through Katrina/BP) and the potential peril of the things we love has been a passionate theme with me Post-Katrina.."
  "I am fully a child of place, I very much draw from my Louisiana world. It's there in almost everything I do. I didn't feel it was necessary to be an artist in the "here and now" in the international community and have to give up my Louisiana vernacular to participate in the universal...." - Dawn Dedeaux    
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  I'm a green brown person, I am a swamp girl and in my heart of hearts I love the "verde" - I love the palm fronds and the marsh grass, the colors of life against death - the green and the brown...I am happy to go in the water...but just as happy on the edge" - Dawn Dedeaux   This image shows the Sunday's cover of the international page of the Arts section of the New York Times. That's a photograph of one of Dawn's installations about Katrina, and is currently on display at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.
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